Category Archives: Antioxidants

Foods High in Glutathione

People are always looking for ways to maintain their health, decrease unwelcome symptoms of aging and boost their immune systems. While a variety of vitamins and minerals can help with some of these functions, there is one nutrient that can help with them all. That nutrient is glutathione, which can be found in a variety of foods. Here are some foods high in glutathione.

Glutathione is a combination of three amino acids known as glutamine, glycine and cysteine. Amino acids are the precursors of proteins. Usually there is a gene in the body that produces an enzyme that combines these amino acids into glutathione. However, this gene does not work correctly in some people. The reasons for this are manifold. For example, it may stop working due to a serious illness. Much of the time, it stops working due to the increased workload on the body’s immune system, such as from air and water pollution and toxins in processed foods. Toxins, such as mercury and lead, can also build up in the body through fish and other foods. Other ways that glutathione levels are decreased include medicines, increased stress and radiation. Even the normal aging process decreases this molecule.

Glutathione is an antioxidant. Without it, the body has great difficulty removing toxins from the blood and from cells in the organs and the skin. Antioxidants decrease the negative effect of free radicals on the cells within the body. Without antioxidants, every cell in the body will readily show the effects of age. Glutathione can also help detoxify the body because the sulfur molecules within glutathione attach to toxins, or poisons, in the body and carry them out as waste products.

A glutathione deficiency may make individuals feel run down. It can leave them with headaches and fatigue. As the body ages, it cannot replenish its supplies of glutathione as well as it once did. Therefore, people must be sure to eat foods high in this molecule to protect their immune systems.

One of the easiest ways to get glutathione from foods is to eat fresh fruits and vegetables. Many of these foods contain some level of glutathione, and those that are raised naturally without chemicals and picked at the peak of ripeness are the best. Fruits that have the highest levels of glutathione include:

  • Apples
  • Bananas
  • Peaches
  • Melons

The best vegetables include:

  • Green peppers
  • Potatoes
  • carrots
  • squash
  • broccoli
  • Spinach

Dark green vegetables are typically rich in sulfur and are therefore rich in glutathione. Milk thistle in a tea, eaten as a seed or sprinkled as a powder, is a great source of glutathione as well.

The second easiest way to consume glutathione is by eating meats and dairy products. Of course, cooking meats decreases the levels of this nutrient; however, there are still smaller levels of glutathione available even after the food is processed or cooked. Beef, chicken, pork, milk and eggs all contain some glutathione.

Selenium and alpha lipoic acid must be consumed as well in order for glutathione to be used in the body. Foods containing selenium include:

  • nuts
  • legumes
  • red meat
  • poultry and cheese

Alpha lipoic acid can be found in several vegetables, including spinach and tomatoes.

Those who are not getting enough glutathione in their diets should consider supplements. These supplements will fill in the gaps in nutrition and may bolster the immune system. As an antioxidant, glutathione is a vital part of anyone’s diet.

Glutathione (GSH) and Electron Flow

GSH and Cellular Health. Glutathione (GSH) is so important to the health of every cell in the body that cells die, when GSH levels inside cells drop too low 1.  It is at this very cellular level where most of the battles against toxins, pathogens, free-radicals, and aging are won or lost.

Even without the extra toxic demands exerted by 21st century living, the requirement for GSH production is high. Immune system cells like mast cells and white blood cells, as well as organ tissues – most notably the brain, heart, lungs, liver, and eyes – depend on GSH for survival. Healthy, unchallenged cells can produce a sufficient amount of GSH for a host of protective (see Table 1.1) and metabolic (see Table 1.2) functions. When additional pressures ensue — like emotional and physical stress, radiation, infection, an unhealthy diet, toxins, heavy metals, and the invasion of pathogens — cellular levels of GSH can be quickly depleted.

Table 1.1 Cell-Protective Functions of GSH
Neutralization and reduction of various toxins and carcinogens
Protection against intracellular oxidative damage
Enhancement and support of the immune system

As long as sufficient quantities of it are present, GSH effectively defends the cell’s DNA, membranes, nucleus, and other organelles by neutralizing this continuous oxidative stress. When GSH is depleted, however, cellular damage can be expected.

Table 1.2 Cell-Metabolic Functions of GSH
Facilitating DNA synthesis and repair
Facilitating protein and prostaglandin synthesis
Facilitating amino acid transport across cell
membranes
Activation of enzymes (includes glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione S-transferase) Czeczot 2006

The Miraculous GSH Molecule

The unique molecular characteristics of GSH account for its vast range of functions. In addition to its role as an electron donor (antioxidant), GSH also joins with a large number of different compounds to form complexes (conjugates) with very special properties. This conjugating ability allows GSH to function as a:

  • potent antioxidant
  • powerful detoxifier as the primary participant in the neutralization and/or excretion of many toxins
  • “Super food” for the immune system including B-cells, T-cells, mast cells, phagocytes, and macrophages
  • intracellular source of organic sulfur
  • cofactor for the function of different critical enzymes
  • participant in maintaining integrity of protein’s critical disulfide bonds
  • transporter of amino acids across cell membranes
  • DNA synthesis and repair
  • protein synthesis
  • electron exchanger in many redox reactions

Electron Flow: Key to Continuous Intracellular Defense. The amazing power of GSH, in large part, lies in its ability to promote a healthy flow and supply of electrons within each cell in the body. Even though it is not possible to take a teaspoon of electrons, one can ingest medications and/or nutrients that are extremely rich in their electron content. Once a sufficient quantity of electrons is delivered to the body, it brings about what can only be described as fantastic results.

For more information on Glutathione, read Dr. Thomas Levy’s book GSH Master Defender.

 

Beaver 1995, Ghibelli 1998, Hammond 2004, Franco 2006

What is a Prooxidant?

What is a Prooxidant? An oxidant, or prooxidant, is any substance that seeks to take electrons away from another substance. When enough electrons are lost without prompt replacement, this process of oxidation eventually results in cellular, and ultimately tissue, damage. Although a very limited amount of oxidation is a necessary and normal part of cellular metabolism, an excess of oxidation is always damaging, will always make you vulnerable to disease, and will always accelerate the aging process.

Virtually every substance that enters the body through respiration, absorption, or ingestion will ultimately be broken down, or digested, into components that are antioxidant or prooxidant. In other words, except for the very rare completely chemically inert substance, everything entering the body will ultimately give or take away electrons at the cellular and subcellular level.

How an Antioxidant Works

An antioxidant, then, is any substance that inhibits or prevents oxidative damage by supplying electrons back to the substance that was oxidized (repair) or by supplying electrons directly to the oxidant substance before it has the opportunity to take or deplete electrons from the target substance (prevention). An antioxidant “cures” oxidation and its free radicals by neutralizing them with an infusion of electrons.

When antioxidants cannot be supplied promptly and in a high enough quantity, oxidative damage will invariably result in electron-depleted cells and tissues, eventually leading to a clinically recognizable disease or toxic condition. Conversely, when there is an adequate supply of antioxidants present while oxidation is occurring, electrons can be supplied back quickly enough and in a sufficient amount so that no significant damage will result.

The cells of the body utilize electrons as their fuel. Antioxidants, in tandem with their oxidized counterparts, can be considered the transport mechanism for allowing adequate access and delivery of this electron “fuel” to all of the different cellular and subcellular sites in the body.

What are Antioxidants and Destroy Free Radicals?

what are antioxidants

Free radicals were little known to most of us 25 years ago. Free radicals are formed in our bodies during normal processes, but as researchers have learned in recent years, excess free radicals can cause major damage throughout the body.  See our full article on free radicals here.

So how do you combat free radicals? By using antioxidants.

What are Antioxidants?

Antioxidants are nutrients that donate electrons to free radicals. Antioxidants neutralize free radicals and assist in returning your body to a balanced state. Antioxidants are found in leafy vegetables and fruits, and they are an essential part of any well balanced diet. Free radicals are formed in our bodies during normal processes. To control the balance of free radicals, you need a constant supply of antioxidants. Some are more powerful than others. Here are a few of the more notable antioxidants.

Vitamin C (Ascorbic Acid)

What are antioxidants? The most recognized antioxidant is vitamin C, which is effective in neutralizing hydroxyl and superoxide radicals. This makes vitamin C one of the most essential nutrients in any diet. Humans, primates, fruit bats and guinea pigs are unable to synthesize vitamin C, making proper nutrition and/or supplementation important in defending against free radical damage. Some great sources for vitamin C include:

Source Serving Vitamin C
Mustard Greens 1/2 Cup 107.8 mg
Red bell peppers 1/2 Cup 95 mg
Green bell peppers 1/2 Cup 60 mg
Kale 1/2 Cup 40 mg
Broccoli 1/2 Cup 67 mg
Papaya 1/2 Cup 44 mg
Strawberries 1/2 Cup 40 mg
Cauliflower Small Head 127 mg
Kiwi 1/2 Cup 137.2 mg

Vitamin E

Vitamin E is a major fat-soluble antioxidant found within the membranes of cells. It protects the fatty acids from damage from peroxyl radicals. Vitamin E is also the principal antioxidant against ozone (O3). Vitamin E must be provided daily through dietary sources or supplementation and can be found in many fresh fruits and vegetables.

Spinach
Spinach is an all-around healthy food. Filled with vitamin E and many other antioxidants and essential nutrients, spinach is easy to incorporate in any diet or dietary plan.
Nuts
Almonds and other nuts are a great source for vitamin E. They are convenient and have a long shelf life. Stick a bag in your desk drawer for a quick healthy snack.
Kale
Kale makes the cut again for being filled with antioxidants.
Fruits
Fruits like papaya and kiwi are great sources of vitamin E and vitamin C, making them a popular food for antioxidant protection.
Red bell peppers
Are you seeing a trend? Many foods are filled with various antioxidants making them a perfect snack or meal for full antioxidant protecting. Red bell peppers are stuffed with vitamin E and C among other essential nutrients.

Beta-carotene

One of about 50 carotenoids, beta-carotene is effective against singlet oxygen. It is considered a weak antioxidant compared to vitamins C and E, however it is is able to convert into vitamin A, a fat-soluble antioxidant. You can find substantial amounts of beta-carotene in yellow and green fruits and vegetables.

Glutathione

Glutathione is not as popular as vitamin C and E however it is one of the most powerful antioxidants available. Glutathione is composed of three amino acids, cysteine, glutamic acid, and glycine. Glutathione (GSH) is able to destroy the free radicals which cause the formation of cross-links in collagen tissue. GSH is also capable of recycling other antioxidants including vitamins C and E. GSH is only available as a dietary supplement.

Asparagus
Asparagus contains rich amounts of glutathione, sometimes referred to as “the mother of all antioxidants.” Asparagus is also rich in other antioxidants such as beta-carotene and selenium.
Nuts
Almonds and other nuts are a great source for vitamin E. They are convenient and have a long shelf life. Stick a bag in your desk drawer for a quick healthy snack.

Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA)

ALA is both water- and fat-soluble, granting it the ability to protect inside and outside the cell membrane. Like glutathione, ALA is capable of recycling other vital antioxidants giving it significant benefits over other antioxidants. Alpha Lipoic Acid is found in small amounts in meat, potatoes, carrots, spinach, and brewer’s yeast, but to obtain a significant amount of it one must supplement.

Selenium

Selenium is the principal mineral antioxidant and is a cofactor in glutathione peroxidase, the body’s own free radical controller. Selenium is also capable of magnifying the effectiveness of vitamin E against free radicals. Great sources for selenium are tuna, wheat germ, sesame seeds, pecans, and other meats.

What are Antioxidants and When Do I need More?

The human body produces tens of thousands of free radicals every second. This makes antioxidants a necessary part of everyone’s daily diet.  The following activities and environmental factors cause an increase in the production of free radicals, and require that you obtain a larger amount of antioxidants.

  1. Exercise
  2. Stress
  3. Exposure to environmental pollutants
  4. Illness
  5. Inflammation
  6. Infection
  7. Elevated blood lipids
  8. Elevated blood sugar
  9. Excessive exposure to UV Light (Sun)

Researchers Claim RDA For Vitamin C is Flawed

The controversy over vitamin C and orthomolecular medicine began with the publication of Linus Pauling’s book, “Vitamin C and the Common Cold”. A quarter of a century later the controversy around vitamin C continues.

Steve Hickey, PhD and Hillary Roberts, Phd, pharmacology professors and graduates of the University of Manchester in Britain, are challenging the established Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for vitamin C, which is 75 and 90 milligrams for males and females respectively. In their book “Ascorbate, The Science of Vitamin C”, Hickey and Roberts point out some biological flaws to justify their attack on the RDA for vitamin C. The rapid elimination of vitamin C was demonstrated graphically; however, the Institute of Medicine (IM) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) did not account for the half-life of vitamin C. This flawed approach is one of the main contentions that Drs. Hickey and Roberts maintain.

Half Life of Vitamin C

The half life of any substance is the time it takes for half of the substance to be removed from the body. Vitamin C’s half life is quite short, about 30 minutes in blood plasma, a fact that the IM and NIH failed to recognize. NIH researchers established the RDA for vitamin C by conducting a test 12 hours or 24 half life’s after consumption. Due to the short half life of vitamin C, many studies make the conclusion that high-dose supplemental vitamin C is ineffective. Drs. Hickey and Roberts state that due to its rapid deterioration, a very high dose of vitamin C would not achieve the same concentration in the blood serum over time as several administered doses.

Drs. Hickey and Roberts decided to perform an experiment to measure the blood plasma levels of liposomal vitamin C, which was published in the Journal of Nutritional and Environmental Medicine. It was titled Pharmacokinetics of oral vitamin C. Their results indicate that, following oral intakes, high blood plasma levels can be achieved with liposomal vitamin C formulations. The results suggest that such levels (400microM/L or above) could be sustained indefinitely with repeated dosing at short intervals (say 5-grams every 4-hours).

RDA for Vitamin C

In the past, Drs. Hickey and Roberts have shaken the foundation and confidence of the IM and NIH for failing to investigate the use of high-dose vitamin C properly. They have repeatedly challenged the RDA for vitamin C on studies using only 15 healthy subjects and single dosages. They also contend that the RDA is intended to set a level of nutrient consumption that would prevent disease, specifically Scurvy, among the vast majority of the population. However their research shows that 35% of the population is in need of more than the RDA including:

  • Smokers ( 50 million)
  • Estrogen and Birth Control Pill Users (13 and 18 million)
  • Diabetics (16 million)
  • Pregnant females (4 million)
  • and even people taking aspirin

Contradictory Data

Drs. Hickey and Roberts confronted the IM and NIH with their own data however they claim the saturation point is reached at a certain concentration of ascorbic acid in blood plasma. They later published a paper in early 2004  showing they had achieved three times greater concentration of vitamin C in the blood circulation than previously thought possible using high-dose vitamin C [Annals Internal Medicine, April 6, 140: 533-37,2004]. A similar published German study also confirms vitamin C supplements can elevate vitamin C concentrations beyond what NIH scientists said was possible. [Archives Biochemistry Biophysics, March 423: 109-15, 2004]. NIH researchers continue to maintain that no more than 200 milligrams of oral vitamin C is required for human health and that a diet which includes the recommended five servings of fruits and vegetables would provide adequate vitamin C. But only 9 percent of the US population consumes 5 servings of plant foods daily. The National Cancer Institute has abandoned their 5-a-day recommendation in favor of a 9-a-day servings of fruits and vegetables once they realized five servings did not provide the proper dietary intake of vitamin C and other essential vitamins in the prevention of cancer or heart disease.

Hickey has called for the IM and NIH to retract the current RDA or provide scientific justification for their recommendation.

What do you think? Is the RDA for vitamin C adequate?

For more on the RDA for vitamin C, check out our article about the RDA for Guinea Pigs.

Liposomal Alpha Lipoic Acid Benefits and Facts

Here is a quick list of Alpha Lipoic Acid benefits and facts. LivOn Labs has successfully encapsulated Alpha Lipoic Acid (R-ALA) and we are excited to tell you all about it!

  • Also known as: Thioctic acid, Lipoic Acid, LA, ALA
  • ALA was discovered in 1948 and officially named Alpha Lipoic Acid in 1951 by Irwin C. Gunsalus and Lester Reed
  • ALA is naturally synthesized in small amounts by plants and animals, including humans.
  • ALA contains an asymmetric carbon, meaning there are two possible isomers: R-LA and S-LA. Only the R- isomer is endogenously synthesized and bound to protein. R-Alpha Lipoic Acid is considered the most bio-available and biologically active form of ALA in the body
  • Alpha Lipoic Acid is a vital cofactor for several important mitochondrial enzyme complexes.
  • The amounts of R-ALA available in dietary supplements are as much as 1,000 times greater than the amounts that could be obtained in the diet.  Animal tissue that includes R-ALA include liver, heart and kidney. Plants with R-ALA include spinach and broccoli, tomatoes, peas and Brussels sprouts.
  • Plasma concentrations of ALA generally peak in an hour or less and decline rapidly.
  • In cells, ALA is quickly reduced to DHLA.
  • ALA functions as an antioxidant.
  • ALA is considered the most important mitochondrial antioxidant given its vital role in mitochondrial electron transport reactions that convert glucose into ATP to produce energy.
  • Recycles other antioxidants, including vitamin C and vitamin E.
  • Shown to increase natural glutathione synthesis in aged animals.
  • There is no documented “nutrient deficiency” disease associated with ALA.
  • Intravenous ALA is approved for the treatment of diabetic neuropathy in Germany. R-ALA is available by prescription in Germany.  Dosage used in a trial with 1,258 diabetic patients found that a treatment of 600mg/day if IV R-ALA for 3 weeks significantly reduced the symptoms of diabetic neuropathy to a clinically meaningful degree.[1]
  • R-ALA should always be taken on an empty stomach.
  • Most frequently reported side effects of oral ALA supplementation include rashes, hives, itching, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. These generally occur when supplementing at doses of 1,200 – 1,800 mg/day.
  • ALA should be taken under the guidance of a physician by anyone taking glucose lowering medication or receiving treatment for under-active or over-active thyroid.
  • ALA should not be taken by children under the age of 18, unless under the care of a physician.
  • “Without ALA, you could not obtain energy from the food you eat, and you could not stay alive.” Burt Berkson, MD, MS, PhD

[1] Ziegler D, Nowak H, Kempler P, Vargha P, Low PA. Treatment of symptomatic diabetic polyneuropathy with the antioxidant alpha-lipoic acid: a meta-analysis. Diabet Med. 2004;21(2):114-121.  (PubMed)

Identifying High-Quality Liposomal Supplements

We have spent years researching the best formulation techniques and manufacturing processes for liposome encapsulated supplements. As part of this research, we analyze every liposomal supplement we come across.  This is what we’ve learned so far…

Liposomal Supplements Must Use Phospholipids Suitable for Making Liposomes.

In order to make strong, stable liposomes that can encapsulate nutrients and not “break apart” too easily, it is important to use Phospholipids from highly refined sources that have a natural mix of phospholipids, including a high percentage of Phosphatidylcholine (PC) and Phosphatidylethanolamine (PE).

Some products are made with low-quality soy lecithin, which does not have the proper percentage of PC or PE to make liposomes.  This type of lecithin is typically used as a food additive, and should not be used in liposomal supplements.

We have always found that Phospholipids extracted from non-GMO soy lecithin work the best for high-quality, affordable liposomal supplements.  While a very high intake of unrefined soy ingested as food may contain tiny amounts of undesirable substances, the intake of highly refined and purified phospholipids derived from soy lecithin does not pose such a risk. In fact, we have not found any evidence of anyone being harmed by the regular intake of phospholipids extracted from non-GMO soy lecithin.

 Liposomal Supplements Must Have at Least an Equal Ratio of Phospholipids to Key Nutrients.

We have analyzed many commercial and homemade products, and found that most of them are of poor quality. Some are merely emulsions.  This means the nutrients are simply mixed with a small amount of low quality phospholipids or lecithin, and there are very few liposomes, if any at all.

One indicator of an emulsion is the amount of phospholipids or lecithin in the product.  For proper liposome encapsulation, you must have at least an equal amount of phospholipids and nutrients.  If the phospholipids or lecithin are listed as “Other Ingredients”, it is very likely there is not enough material to create any liposomes, even if the production process is otherwise appropriate.

Some companies choose to make emulsions and call them “Liposomal Supplements” because they are easy and inexpensive to produce.   Whether they believe they have products that are legitimately encapsulated in liposomes is unknown.

If you take an emulsion that contains lecithin and a nutrient like vitamin C, you may see overall good results since both components are excellent supplements individually.  You will not, however, be able to experience the potentially exceptional results offered by products using real Liposome Encapsulation Technology.

Liposomal Supplements Must Be Protected from Oxygen.

Liposomes are a natural fit for water-soluble nutrients that are not otherwise bioavailable.  But the process of making stable, quality liposomes is tricky.  Liposomes are sensitive to things like heat and oxygen.  The inherent stability (and in some cases instability), of the phospholipids and each nutrient also play an important role in the overall stability of liposomal products.  Getting all of these things exactly right, then assuring the liposomes and nutrients remain stable throughout the product’s shelf life is key.

One way to enhance the stability of a liposomal product is through uni-dose packaging.  Many of the liposomal products we have analyzed are stored in jars, plastic bottles, or even capsules within bottles.  Opening the bottle to remove the product exposes the remaining product to heat, light and oxygen.  This can be detrimental to the liposomes, and can cause rapid degradation of the nutrients.

Uni-dose packaging protects the product from oxygen until moments before it’s consumed, keeping it safe and effective throughout the shelf-life of the product.

 Three More Signs of a Low-Quality Liposomal Supplement:

  1. Consistency. If the product is very watery, it is most likely due to an insufficient amount of phospholipids or the use of low quality phospholipids.
  2. Uniformity. If the product separates into layers, it is a strong indicator the liposomal mixture is deteriorating. On the other hand, if there are noticeable lumps or the product feels gritty, it is a sign that the nutrients are coming out of the liposomes and forming crystals.
  3. Size. If the volume of the dosage is too small, there are not enough phospholipids and water to make proper liposomes.  For example, 1,000mg of vitamin C and 1,000mg of phospholipids, along with the necessary amount of water for proper liposome formation, will fill a teaspoon (5mL).  It is not likely this amount of material could fit into one or even two large-sized capsules.

The Bottom Line

There are a plethora of liposomal supplements to choose from.  Some are great, many are not.  The key is finding the liposomal supplements that work best for you – from a company you can trust. LivOn Labs offers a 100% Lifetime Satisfaction Guarantee so you can try the Lypo-Spheric™ products for yourself.  If you are not satisfied, at any time, return the unused portion – or even the empty carton – and we will refund every penny you paid.

You Asked, We Listened. Introducing Lypo-Spheric B Complex Plus

LivOn Labs is proud to announce Lypo-Spheric™ B Complex Plus. Our new, Ultimate AGE+ Blocking Formula with a new, all natural flavor!

Seeking natural energy production and maintenance of healthy blood sugar levels, customers have requested a Lypo-Spheric™ B Complex for years. What many did not realize is that our AGE Blocker™ is a complete B Complex, just under a different name. We decided to clarify this misconception by updating the name to more accurately describe the product.

We are discontinuing AGE Blocker. Lypo-Spheric™ B Complex Plus will be available to give you the same AGE-blocking benefits at a new lower price.

What has changed, other than the name?

  • Upgraded ingredients and phospholipids to ensure every ingredient is 100% non-GMO.
  • Improved flavor profile with all natural, mixed-fruit flavoring.
  • Increased the amount of B12 (Methylcobalamin) to 50mcg. This helps provide extended energy throughout the day.
  • Removed the Indium, Magnesium, and Manganese.
  • Replaced preservatives Sodium Benzoate and Potassium Sorbate with 12% natural grain alcohol – a great, all-natural preservative.
  • New low price of $32.95.
    + Advanced Glycation End Products (AGE)

Are You Healthier Than A Guinea Pig?

The US Recommended Dietary Allowance for vitamin C is higher for Guinea Pigs than it is for humans!

You may be thinking, that can’t be true but read on.

The US Department of Agriculture states

“The Guinea pig’s vitamin C requirement is 10-15 mg per day under normal conditions and 15-25 mg per day if pregnant, lactating, or growing.”(1)

Doesn’t sound shocking until you realize that an adult guinea pig weighs about 2.2 pounds. Guinea pigs therefore need between 10-25 milligrams of vitamin c per pound. The average human weighs 180 pounds however the US RDA for vitamin C is 90 mg for men, 75 mg for women, and if you smoke, they allow an additional 35 mg/day. All of these figures are inadequate if we measure up pound for pound with the guinea pig.

guinea pigs vitamin c

So how much vitamin C should we consume?

If we use the same logic the US Government uses on guinea pigs, our vitamin C intake should be between 820 mg and 2,000 mg.

According to a recent article written by Andrew W. Saul, Ph.D., it is “no wonder that so many people are sick and no wonder their medical bills are so high.”

Dr. Saul concludes his article by saying, “If we are going to have health insurance coverage for everyone, wouldn’t it be nice for the government to first offer us the same deal it gives to Guinea pigs?”

What do you think?

guinea-pig-480x280

(1) US Department of Agriculture Animal Care Resource Guide, Animal Care, 12.4.2 http://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_welfare

 

 

Can You Die from Too Much Vitamin C?

orange slicesThe evidence says, “vitamin  C is safer than drinking water.” Researchers have documented lethal overdoses of water,1 yet no lethal dose has been found for vitamin  C. 2

There’s not a single drug — prescription or over-the-counter — that can claim that level of safety. As well, there are few other nutritive supplements that can even approach the safety of any amount of vitamin C. Vitamin C is an essential nutrient and important for your diet since humans are one of the few mammals that does not produce or store vitamin C.

Shocking Revelations

According to an article published in the Journal of the American Medical Association3, 106,000 patients died in hospitals in 1994 from drug reactions. This figure has remained unchanged for 30 years. That means from 1965 – 1994, over 3 million people died in hospitals because of prescription drugs!

In contrast, high-dose vitamin  C has been widely used since the late 1940’s without a confirmed report of any dosage level that will result in serious adverse effects. In fact, in 11 studies with high-dose vitamin C no side effects were reported.

Too Much Vitamin C

Regardless of any claims to the contrary, no one who has done a critical appraisal of the scientific literature can say anything other than, “Vitamin  C is one of the safest substances on earth.”

Resources

  1. Hayashi T, et al, “Fatal water intoxication in a schizophrenic patient–an autopsy case” J Clin Forensic Med. 2005 Jun;12(3):157-9. Epub 2005 Mar 16.
  2. Levy T, Curing the Incurable. Vitamin C, Infectious Diseases, and Toxins 2004,  MedFox Publishing, Henderson, NV.
  3. Lazarou J, Pomeranz BH, Corey PN, “Incidence of adverse drug reactions in hospitalized patients: a meta-analysis of prospective studies” JAMA 1998  279:10-15

 About the Author

too much vitamin c Thomas E. Levy, MD, JD is a board-certified cardiologist and the author of Curing the Incurable: Vitamin C, Infectious Diseases, and Toxins and STOP America’s #1 Killer! plus three other ground-breaking medical books. He is one of the leading vitamin C experts in the world and frequently lectures about the proper role of vitamin C and antioxidants in the treatment of a host of medical conditions and diseases to medical professionals all over the globe.