Monthly Archives: March 2018

Surprising Sources of Vitamin C

Our bodies rely on Vitamin C to perform so many important functions, functions, like neutralizing free radicals within our cells. Vitamin C is an essential nutrient. That means that, although our bodies require it to perform vital functions, our cells can’t produce it. A nutrient-dense diet is the most efficient to get Vitamin C, and it’s a lot tastier and more colorful than you think. After all, oranges aren’t the only source of Vitamin C

sources of vitamin c

Bell Peppers
A single cup of chopped bell peppers can provide your body with 100 mg of Vitamin C. Compare that to the approximately 70 mg of vitamin C from a medium-sized orange! One thing to note is that your choice of cooking method can affect the vitamin C content that you actually consume. Unlike vitamin C supplements that always deliver the same amount of milligrams, fresh produce can gain and lose milligrams through the cooking process.

A favorite among cruciferous vegetable enthusiasts, one serving of raw or steamed broccoli provides as much as 132 mg of Vitamin C.

A little but mighty fruit, Kiwi is rich in potassium, copper and Vitamin C.  A serving of approximately two kiwi fruits will give you as much as 137 mg of Vitamin C, no cooking necessary.  

Vitamin Supplements
Sometimes you just might not be able to get your hands on enough fruits and veggies to meet your body’s demands for Vitamin C. Lypo-Spheric™ Vitamin C supplements can deliver up to 200% more of this essential nutrient than previously thought possible with oral supplements. While eating Vitamin C-rich foods is always the tastier, more enjoyable option, supplements are a convenient way to keep your body fortified.

Between the citrus, berries, peppers and cruciferous vegetables, there’s a source of Vitamin C for every taste. Vitamin C supports the body in so many vital processes; make sure you’re getting enough through diet and supplements.

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

1 Hickey S., Roberts H, Miller N, (2008), “Pharmacokinetics of oral vitamin C” Journal of Nutritional & Environmental Medicine July 31.

Strive For Optimal Health With These Vitamin Combinations

Did you know that certain vitamins work together to create a synergistic effect that enhances your body’s ability to absorb and utilize nutrients to their fullest extent? As you work toward reaching optimal health, consider combining these vitamins and minerals to get the most out of your healthy diet and supplementation regimen.

vitamin combinations

Black Pepper and Vitamin B12

Vitamin B12 is known for its effect on metabolism and energy. However, the process of extracting vitamin B12 from food can get complicated for your body. Your stomach secretes hydrochloric acid and the digestive enzyme pepsin to free the B12 from the food source. The B12 then combines with a special protein that protects it during the journey to the small intestine where it is finally absorbed. Black pepper contains piperine, a special alkaloid that helps your body absorb more of the B12 once it hits the intestine.

Iron and Vitamin C

Iron deficiency can lead to a variety of health issues, including anemia. Iron comes in heme and non-heme forms, and Vitamin C can increase your body’s absorption of non-heme iron. Heme iron, such as that found in meats, is more easily absorbed by your body than non-heme forms that come from plant-based foods. For this reason, many people prefer to take Vitamin C supplements, like our  Lypo-Spheric™ Vitamin C, when they consume non-heme sources of iron.

Vitamin A and Iron

Vitamin A is known for helping cell reproduction, healthy vision and proper growth. You can get this fat-soluble vitamin as retinyl palmitate through your diet; most of it is stored in your liver until it is ready for use. Your body can also convert beta-carotene from fruits and vegetables into vitamin A. Supplementing with Vitamin A may also have a beneficial effect on iron deficiency, with a combination of supplemental Vitamin A and iron being more effective than either supplement by itself.

Knowing how to combine certain vitamins allows you to get the most nutrition from your diet. While all vitamins support the body’s ability to perform various important functions, it’s always nice to be as efficient as possible. 

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Signs You May Be Vitamin C Deficient

Vitamin C is one of the most important water-soluble vitamins that you should include in your daily diet. You can’t store vitamin C, so make sure you’re eating foods rich in Vitamin C every day. If you’re an adult, the FDA currently recommends at least 90 milligrams of vitamin C each day. Some studies, however, indicate optimum doses are much higher – closer to 1,000 milligrams a day. For doses that high, you need to take vitamin C supplements.

signs of vitamin c deficiency

It’s tough to monitor micronutrient intake, so you may not even know you’re not getting enough Vitamin C on a daily basis. If you’re chronically low, your body will let you know with several symptoms of a Vitamin C deficiency.

Signs of Vitamin C Deficiency

  • Minor bleeding, such as nose bleeds, or easy bruising.
  • Dry, split hair due to inadequate collagen.
  • Slow wound healing. Vitamin C promotes collagen development in scar tissue.
  • Iron deficiency. Vitamin C promotes iron absorption, so low vitamin C and low iron levels often coexist.
  • Fatigue and mood changes. Vitamin C affects energy production and helps stabilize your moods.
  • Weight gain. You have less energy when vitamin C levels are low, so you are less likely to exercise regularly or vigorously.
  • Swollen, bleeding gums. A symptom of scurvy, this occurs in advanced cases when you’ve been low on Vitamin C for at least six months.

Confirming a Deficiency

If you’re concerned that you’re Vitamin C deficient, you can get a blood test to measure the level of ascorbic acid in your blood. A level above 0.6 mg/dL indicates you’re getting enough Vitamin C. Levels of less than 0.3 mg/dL indicate a deficiency.

Vitamin C is readily available in many fruits and vegetables. While citrus may come to mind first, you can also find a high density of Vitamin C in strawberries, papaya, bell peppers, tomatoes and even cauliflower. And some of the most bioavailable Vitamin C supplements are just a click away.

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Everyday Foods That are Power-Packed with Vitamins

Vitamins are important to your health – affecting multiple biological processes that help you see, build your blood and bones, and support natural hormone production. Many foods contain more than one vitamin and certain foods are the optimum choice for a particular vitamin. Here are the best choices to make sure you meet your daily vitamin needs.

vitamin rich foods

  • Vitamin A – important to maintain healthy immunity and vision. Best food sources: beef, carrots, sweet potatoes.
  • Vitamin B6 – helps metabolize foods, maintain healthy blood sugar levels, make antibodies and promote red blood cell production. Best food sources: Chickpeas (garbanzo bean), fish, bananas.
  • Vitamin B12 – promotes healthy DNA and red blood cell formation and keeps the nervous system healthy. Best food sources: beef, poultry, cheese.
  • Vitamin C – supports healthy immunity and skin. Best food sources: sweet red peppers, potatoes, citrus fruit.
  • Vitamin D – helps promote bone and cell growth, and aids in calcium absorption. Your body makes it from sunlight. Best food sources: cod liver oil, milk, and fish.
  • Vitamin E – supports a healthy immune system and blood vessel function. Best food sources: wheat germ oil, leafy green vegetables, and nuts.
  • Folic Acid (Folate) (Vitamin B9) – folate promotes the healthy growth of new tissue and proteins. Best food sources: beef liver, asparagus, spinach.
  • Vitamin K – required to help the blood clot. Best food sources: kale, cabbage, eggs.
  • Niacin (Vitamin B3) – helps convert food into energy. Best food sources: turkey, peanuts, beef.
  • Riboflavin (Vitamin B2) – used to support natural energy creation and healthy blood cells. Best source: beef liver, lamb, milk.
  • Thiamin (Vitamin B1) – necessary for energy from carbohydrates and helps promote nervous system function. Best source: soybeans, yeast extract, green peas.

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.